Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

v3.7.0.1
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2017
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of Presentation

The accompanying interim condensed financial statements are unaudited. These unaudited interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP (“GAAP”) and following the requirements of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) for interim reporting. As permitted under those rules, certain footnotes or other financial information that are normally required by GAAP can be condensed or omitted. In management’s opinion, the unaudited interim condensed financial statements have been prepared on the same basis as the audited financial statements and include normal recurring adjustments necessary for the fair presentation of the Company’s financial position and its results of operations and comprehensive loss and its cash flows for the periods presented. These statements do not include all disclosures required by GAAP and should be read in conjunction with the Company’s financial statements and accompanying notes for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016, which is contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K as filed with the SEC on March 23, 2017. The results for the six months ended June 30, 2017 are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected for the year or for any other period.

 

Use of Estimates

The condensed financial statements have been prepared in accordance with GAAP, which requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts and disclosures reported in the condensed financial statements and accompanying notes. Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on assumptions believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. The estimation process often may yield a range of potentially reasonable estimates of actual future outcomes, and management must select an amount that falls within that range of reasonable estimates. Actual results could differ materially from those estimates. The Company believes significant judgment is involved in estimating revenue, stock-based compensation, accrued clinical expenses, and equity instrument valuations.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The Company’s financial instruments during the periods reported consist of cash and cash equivalents, marketable securities, prepaid expenses, other current assets, other assets, accounts payable, accrued interest payable, accrued liabilities, the facility loan, and warrant liabilities. Fair value estimates of these instruments are made at a specific point in time, based on relevant market information. These estimates may be subjective in nature and involve uncertainties and matters of significant judgment. The carrying amounts of financial instruments such as cash and cash equivalents, prepaid expenses, other current assets, other assets, accounts payable, accrued liabilities, and accrued interest payable approximate the related fair values due to the short maturities of these instruments. Based on prevailing borrowing rates available to the Company for loans with similar terms, the Company believes the fair value of the facility loan, considering level 2 inputs, approximates its carrying value.

Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value are reported using a three-level fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs used to measure fair value. This hierarchy maximizes the use of observable and unobservable inputs and is as follows:

Level 1—Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the Company has the ability to access at the measurement date.

Level 2—Inputs other than quoted prices in active markets that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3—Inputs that are significant to the fair value measurement and are unobservable (i.e. supported by little market activity), which requires the reporting entity to develop its own valuation techniques and assumptions.

 

The following tables present the fair value of the Company’s financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis using the above input categories (in thousands):

 

     As of June 30, 2017  

Description

   Level 1      Level 2      Level 3      Fair Value  

Cash equivalents:

           

Money market funds

   $ 7,118      $ —        $ —        $ 7,118  

Commercial paper

     —          1,300        —          1,300  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total cash equivalents

     7,118        1,300        —          8,418  

Marketable securities:

           

Commercial paper

     —          3,647        —          3,647  

Corporate debt securities

     —          2,200        —          2,200  

Asset-backed securities

     —          1,370        —          1,370  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total short-term investments

     —          7,217        —          7,217  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total assets measured at fair value

   $ 7,118      $ 8,517      $ —        $ 15,635  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Warrant liability

   $ —        $ —        $ 4,343      $ 4,343  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total liabilities measured at fair value

   $ —        $ —        $ 4,343      $ 4,343  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

     As of December 31, 2016  

Description

   Level 1      Level 2      Level 3      Fair Value  

Cash equivalents:

           

Money market funds

   $ 9,456      $ —        $ —        $ 9,456  

Commercial paper

     —          599        —          599  

Corporate debt securities

     —          500        —          500  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total cash equivalents

     9,456        1,099        —          10,555  

Marketable securities:

           

Commercial paper

     —          4,295        —          4,295  

Corporate debt securities

     —          2,204        —          2,204  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total short-term investments

     —          6,499        —          6,499  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total assets measured at fair value

   $ 9,456      $ 7,598      $ —        $ 17,054  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Warrant liability

   $ —        $ —        $ 1,145      $ 1,145  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total liabilities measured at fair value

   $ —        $ —        $ 1,145      $ 1,145  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The Company estimates the fair value of its corporate debt and asset backed securities by taking into consideration valuations obtained from third-party pricing services. The pricing services utilize industry standard valuation models, including both income and market-based approaches, for which all significant inputs are observable, either directly or indirectly, to estimate fair value. These inputs include reported trades of and broker/dealer quotes on the same or similar securities, issuer credit spreads, benchmark securities, prepayment/default projections based on historical data, and other observable inputs.

There were no transfers between Level 1 and Level 2 during the periods presented.

The Company holds a Level 3 liability associated with common stock warrants that were issued in connection with the Company’s financings completed in September and October 2013, January 2014, and August 2015. The warrants are considered liabilities and are valued using a binomial lattice option-pricing model, the inputs for which include the exercise price of the warrants, market price of the underlying common shares, expected term, volatility, the risk-free rate, key strategic initiatives, the probability of success related to those initiatives, and the expected changes in stock price that follow announcements of the Company’s strategic initiatives. Changes to any of these inputs to the option-pricing model used by the Company can have a significant impact to the estimated fair value of the warrants. For example, the increase in fair value of the level 3 common stock warrant as of the six months ended June 30, 2017 was primarily due to an increase in the market price of the Company’s common stock from $1.73 at December 31, 2016 to $5.76 at June 30, 2017, and to a lesser extent, changes in the probability of trial success and the expected future change in the Company’s stock price.

The following table sets forth an activity summary which includes the changes in the fair value of the Company’s Level 3 financial instruments (in thousands):

 

     For the Six  
     Months Ended June 30,  
     2017      2016  

Balance, beginning of period

   $ 1,145      $ 1,220  

Issuance of financial instrument

     —          —    

Change in fair value

     3,198        39  

Settlement of financial instrument

     —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance, end of period

   $ 4,343      $ 1,259  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Cash, Cash Equivalents, and Marketable Securities

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with a remaining maturity of 90 days or less at the time of purchase to be cash equivalents. Cash and cash equivalents consist of deposits with commercial banks in checking, interest-bearing, demand money market accounts, and corporate debt securities.

The Company invests excess cash in marketable securities with high credit ratings, which are classified in Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy. These securities consist primarily of corporate debt, commercial paper, and asset-backed securities and are classified as “available-for-sale.” Management may liquidate any of these investments in order to meet the Company’s liquidity needs in the next year. Accordingly, any investments with contractual maturities greater than one year from the balance sheet date are classified as short-term in the accompanying condensed balance sheets.

Realized gains and losses from the sale of marketable securities, if any, are calculated using the specific identification method. Realized gains and losses and declines in value judged to be other-than-temporary are included in interest income or expense in the statements of operations and comprehensive loss. Unrealized holding gains and losses are reported in accumulated other comprehensive loss, in the balance sheets. To date, the Company has not recorded any impairment charges on its marketable securities related to other-than-temporary declines in market value. In determining whether a decline in market value is other-than-temporary, various factors are considered, including the cause, duration of time and severity of the impairment, any adverse changes in the investees’ financial condition, and the Company’s intent and ability to hold the security for a period of time sufficient to allow for an anticipated recovery in market value.

 

The following tables present the Company’s marketable securities (in thousands):

 

            Gross      Gross         
     Amortized      Unrealized      Unrealized      Estimated  
     Cost      Gains      Losses      Fair Value  

As of June 30, 2017:

           

Marketable securities:

           

Commercial paper

     3,647        —          —          3,647  

Corporate debt securities

     2,201        —          (1      2,200  

Asset-backed securities

     1,370        —          —          1,370  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 7,218      $ —        $ (1    $ 7,217  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

            Gross      Gross         
     Amortized      Unrealized      Unrealized      Estimated  
     Cost      Gains      Losses      Fair Value  

As of December 31, 2016:

           

Marketable securities:

           

Commercial paper

     4,295        —          —          4,295  

Corporate debt securities

     2,205        —          (1      2,204  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 6,500      $ —        $ (1    $ 6,499  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Concentration of Credit Risk

Cash, cash equivalents, and marketable securities consist of financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to a concentration of credit risk to the extent of the fair value recorded in the balance sheets. The Company invests cash that is not required for immediate operating needs primarily in highly liquid instruments that bear minimal risk. The Company has established guidelines relating to the quality, diversification, and maturities of securities to enable the Company to manage its credit risk. The Company is exposed to credit risk in the event of a default by the financial institutions holding its cash, cash equivalents and investments and issuers of investments to the extent recorded on the balance sheets.

Certain materials and key components that the Company utilizes in its operations are obtained through single suppliers. Since the suppliers of key components and materials must be named in a new drug application (NDA) filed with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a product, significant delays can occur if the qualification of a new supplier is required. If delivery of material from the Company’s suppliers were interrupted for any reason, the Company may be unable to supply any of its product candidates for clinical trials.

Revenue Recognition

The Company recognizes revenue when (i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (ii) delivery has occurred or services have been rendered, (iii) the price is fixed or determinable, and (iv) collectability is reasonably assured. Payments received in advance of work performed are recorded as deferred revenue and recognized when earned.

Collaboration and license agreements may include non-refundable upfront license fees, contingent consideration payments based on the achievement of defined collaboration objectives and royalties on sales of commercialized products. The Company’s performance obligations under collaboration and license agreements may include the license or transfer of intellectual property rights, obligations to provide research and development services and related materials and obligations to participate on certain development and/or commercialization committees with the collaborators.

If the Company determines that multiple deliverables in an arrangement exist, the consideration is allocated to one or more units of accounting based upon the relative-selling-price of each element in an arrangement. The relative-selling-price used for each deliverable is based on vendor-specific objective evidence, if available, third-party evidence if vendor-specific objective evidence is not available, or estimated selling price if neither vendor-specific or third-party evidence is available. The Company identifies deliverables at the inception of the arrangement. Each deliverable is accounted for as a separate unit of accounting if both of the following criteria are met: (1) the delivered item or items have value to the customer on a standalone basis and (2) for an arrangement that includes a general right of return relative to the delivered items, delivery or performance of the undelivered items is considered probable and substantially in the Company’s control. Non-refundable upfront payments received and allocated to separate units of accounting are recognized as revenue when the four basic revenue recognition criteria are met for each unit of accounting.

The Company recognizes payments that are contingent upon achievement of a substantive milestone in their entirety in the period in which the milestone is achieved. Milestones are defined as events that can only be achieved based on the Company’s performance and there is substantive uncertainty about whether the event will be achieved at the inception of the arrangement. Events that are contingent only on the passage of time or only on counterparty performance are not considered milestones subject to this guidance. Further, the amounts received must relate solely to prior performance, be reasonable relative to all of the deliverables and payment terms within the agreement and commensurate with the Company’s performance to achieve the milestone after commencement of the agreement. Any contingent payment that becomes payable upon achievement of events that are not considered substantive milestones are allocated to the units of accounting previously identified at the inception of an arrangement when the contingent payment is received and revenue is recognized based on the revenue recognition criteria for each unit of accounting.

Common Stock Warrant Liability

The Company’s outstanding common stock warrants issued in connection with certain equity and debt financings that occurred in 2013 through 2015 are classified as liabilities in the accompanying condensed balance sheets because of certain contractual terms that preclude equity classification. The warrants are recorded at fair value using a binomial lattice option-pricing model. The warrants are re-measured at each financial reporting period until the warrants are exercised or expire, with any changes in fair value being recognized as a component of other income (expense), net in the accompanying condensed statements of operations and comprehensive loss.

Stock-Based Compensation

Employee and director stock-based compensation is measured at fair value on the grant date of the award. Compensation cost is recognized as expense on a straight-line basis over the vesting period for options and on an accelerated basis for stock options with performance conditions. For stock options with performance conditions, the Company evaluates the probability of achieving performance conditions at each reporting date. The Company begins to recognize the expense when it is deemed probable that the performance conditions will be met. The Company uses the Black-Scholes option pricing model to determine the fair value of stock option awards. The determination of fair value for stock-based awards using an option-pricing model requires management to make certain assumptions regarding subjective input variables such as expected term, dividends, volatility and risk-free interest rate. The Company is also required to make estimates as to the probability of achieving the specific performance criteria. If actual results are not consistent with the Company’s assumptions and judgments used in making these estimates, the Company may be required to increase or decrease compensation expense, which could be material to the Company’s results of operations.

Equity awards granted to non-employees are valued using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. Stock-based compensation expense for nonemployee services is subject to remeasurement as the underlying equity instruments vest and is recognized as an expense over the period during which services are received.

Net Loss Per Common Share

Basic net loss per share of common stock is based on the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding equivalents during the period. Diluted net loss per share of common stock is calculated as the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding adjusted to include the assumed exercises of stock options and common stock warrants, if dilutive.

The calculation of diluted loss per share also requires that, to the extent the average market price of the underlying shares for the reporting period exceeds the exercise price of the common stock warrants and the presumed exercise of such securities are dilutive to net loss per share for the period, adjustments to net loss used in the calculation are required to remove the change in fair value of the common stock warrant liability for the period. Likewise, adjustments to the denominator are required to reflect the related dilutive shares.

 

In all periods presented, the Company’s outstanding stock options and warrants were excluded from the calculation of diluted net loss per share because their effects were antidilutive. The Company’s computation of basic and diluted net loss per share is as follows (in thousands, except share and per share amounts):

 

     Three Months Ended      Six Months Ended  
     June 30,      June 30,  
     2017      2016      2017      2016  

Numerator:

           

Net loss allocated to common stock-basic

   $ (8,929    $ (6,992    $ (14,280    $ (13,840

Adjustments for revaluation of warrants

     —          —          —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net loss allocated to common stock-diluted

   $ (8,929    $ (6,992    $ (14,280    $ (13,840
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Denominator:

           

Weighted average number of common stock shares outstanding—basic

     28,752,451        23,447,003        27,687,110        23,447,003  

Weighted average number of common stock shares outstanding—diluted

     28,752,451        23,447,003        27,687,110        23,447,003  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net loss per share—basic:

   $ (0.31    $ (0.30    $ (0.52    $ (0.59

Net loss per share—diluted:

   $ (0.31    $ (0.30    $ (0.52    $ (0.59

The following table shows the total outstanding common stock equivalents considered anti-dilutive and therefore excluded from the computation of diluted net loss per share (in thousands).

 

     Three Months Ended      Six Months Ended  
     June 30,      June 30,  
     2017      2016      2017      2016  

Warrants for common stock

     1,667        1,667        1,667        1,667  

Common stock options

     4,130        2,415        4,130        2,415  

Incentive awards

     239        243        239        243  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     6,036        4,325        6,036        4,325  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Accounting Standards Update 2014-09

In May 2014, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers and related amendments. Subsequently, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the FASB) issued the following standards related to ASU 2014-09: ASU No. 2016-08, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Principal versus Agent Considerations; ASU No. 2016-10, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Identifying Performance Obligations and Licensing; and ASU No. 2016-12, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Narrow-Scope Improvements and Practical Expedients. This guidance outlines a new, single comprehensive model for entities to use in accounting for revenue arising from contracts with customers and supersedes nearly all of the existing revenue recognition guidance, including industry-specific guidance. This new revenue recognition model provides a five-step analysis in determining when and how revenue is recognized. The new model will require revenue recognition to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration a company expects to receive in exchange for those goods or services.

The new revenue standard permits two methods of adoption: retrospectively to each prior reporting period presented (full retrospective method), or retrospectively with the cumulative effect of initially applying the guidance recognized at the date of initial application (the modified retrospective method). The Company plans to adopt the new revenue standard in the first quarter of 2018 using the modified retrospective method.

 

While the Company has not completed an assessment of the impact of adoption, the adoption of this guidance may have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements. At the end of 2016, the Company entered into a license agreement. Before executing this agreement, the Company has had no revenues for the last two years. The consideration that the Company is eligible to receive under this agreement includes an upfront payment, milestone payments, and royalties. This license agreement is unique and will need to be assessed separately under the five-step process under the new standard. The Company is currently analyzing this agreement to determine the differences in the accounting treatment under the new revenue standard compared to that of the current accounting treatment. The new revenue standard differs from the current accounting standard in many respects, such as in the accounting for variable consideration, including milestone payments and royalties. The Company expects that its evaluation of the accounting for this agreement under the new revenue standard could identify material changes from that of the current accounting treatment and it could also impact its condensed financial statement disclosures.

Accounting Standards Update 2016-02

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). The new standard requires the recognition of assets and liabilities arising from lease transactions on the balance sheet and the disclosure of key information about leasing arrangements. Accordingly, a lessee will recognize a lease asset for its right to use the underlying asset and a lease liability for the corresponding lease obligation. Both the asset and liability will initially be measured at the present value of the future minimum lease payments over the lease term. Subsequent measurement, including the presentation of expenses and cash flows, will depend on the classification of the lease as either a finance or an operating lease. Initial costs directly attributable to negotiating and arranging the lease will be included in the asset. Lessees will also be required to provide additional qualitative and quantitative disclosures regarding the amount, timing and uncertainty of cash flows arising from leases. The new standard is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods therein. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact that this guidance will have on its condensed financial statements.

Accounting Standards Update 2016-09

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-09, Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting, which amends ASC Topic 718, Compensation – Stock Compensation (ASU 2016-09). This guidance simplifies the accounting for the taxes related to stock based compensation, requiring excess tax benefits and deficiencies to be recognized as a component of income tax expense rather than equity. This guidance also requires excess tax benefits and deficiencies to be presented as an operating activity on the statement of cash flows and allows an entity to make an accounting policy election to either estimate expected forfeitures or to account for them as they occur. The Company adopted ASU 2016-09 on January 1, 2017 following the modified retrospective approach. Under this guidance, on a prospective basis, the Company will no longer record excess tax benefits and certain tax deficiencies in additional paid-in capital (APIC). Instead, the Company will record all excess tax benefits and tax deficiencies as income tax expense or benefit in the income statement. In addition, the guidance eliminates the requirement that excess tax benefits be realized before companies can recognize them. The ASU requires a cumulative-effect adjustment for previously unrecognized excess tax benefits in opening retained earnings in the annual period of adoption. As of January 1, 2017, the Company had no material excess tax benefits for which a benefit could not be previously recognized. In addition and as provided for under this guidance, the Company made an accounting policy election to recognize forfeitures as they occur. This policy election did not have a material impact on the condensed financial statements.

Accounting Standards Update 2017-09

In May 2017, FASB issued ASU No. 2017-09, Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718)- Scope of Modification Accounting (ASU 2017- 09). The amendments included in this update provide guidance about which changes to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award require an entity to apply modification accounting. The amendments in this update will be applied prospectively to an award modified on or after the adoption date. The amendments in ASU 2017-09 are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2017. The adoption of this standard is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements.